File Name West1784_3
Call Number DA 670 L1 W52 1784
Title A Guide to the Lakes, in Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire. By the Author of The Antiquities of Furness. The Third Edition, Revised Throughout and Greatly Englarged.
Short Title A Guide to the Lakes
Series Title
Title Page Quotation "For Nature here / Wanton'd as in her prime, and play'd at will / Her virgin fancies. / Wild above rule or art (and beauteous form'd) / A happy rural seat of various view." Paradise Lost.
Dedication
Imprint London: Printed for B.Law, Ave Mary Lane; Richardson and Urquhart, under the Royal Exchange; J. Robson, New Bond Street; and W. Pennington, Kendal, 1784.
Edition 3
Publication Date 1784
Volumes 1
Pages 319
Copies 1
SFU Catalogue Original Bibliography xii, 251 p. : ill., front., fold. map. 14 x 21 cm. Half bound in calf, marbled boards.
Print Run
Title URI http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/243536572
Digital Object URL
Bibliographic Notes Our copy: bookplate "Sir John Smith, Bart."; writing in pencil on inside front cover "2 vols w1 / £225.00" ; spine damaged. Title on spine "Guide to the Lakes." There is also bound in with the Guide, "Remarks Made in a Tour from London to the Lakes of Westmoreland and Cumberland in the Summer of 1791. Originally Published in the Whitehall Evening Post, and Now Reprinted with Additions and Corrections. To Which is Annexed, a Sketch of the Police, Religion, Arts, and Agriculture of France, Made in an Excursion to Paris in 1785. By A. Walker, Lecturer in Experimental Philosophy; and Author of 'Ideas Suggested on the Spot in a Tour to Italy,' &c. London: Printed for G. Nicol, Bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall; and C. Dilly in the Poultry. 1792." *this may be Adam Walker 1730-1821
Critical Annotation

Thomas West was born Thomas Daniel in Scotland, and both his reason for changing his name and the date of his birth, are uncertain. While some scholars place his birth year in 1720, the third edition of his Guide says he passed away at 63, which would make his birth year 1716. He lived in Edinburgh, and it is possible that he traveled during his early years while working in trade (ODNB). He studied under the Jesuits, and became a priest in 1769, going by the name Father Thomas Watson (original biblio). He became chaplain at Titeup Hall near Dalton in Furness, where he wrote The Antiquities of Furness; he was later installed in Ulverston, where he wrote The Guide to the Lakes (original biblio), following his hobby of taking “genteel” tourists on tours of the Lakes (3rd ed, vi). West was a correspondent with fellow Lake District writer Thomas Pennant (ODNB). He died in Sizergh, Westmorland on 10 July 1779. While the concept of the “Picturesque tour of the lakes” was not new, West is considered to have “institutionalized” the tour, and he is often given credit by other writers for directing tourists to “Stations,” particular spots from which to view Lake District scenery (Andrews 158). For his part, West was very influenced by and quoted from Young, Pennant, Gray, and Hutchinson. West claims that the Lake District will draw those from all classes who have curious, and particularly those with a taste for the “noble art” of landscape painting (1-2); he likens a tour of the district to the Continental tour “in miniature,” claiming the area’s mountains rival the Alps (4-6). The guide is divided into sections featuring areas to visit, and in these, some select views are numbered as stations. Like Gray, West recommends the use of a landscape mirror (Bicknell), and like Hutchinson, describes the scenery of the district in the styles of painters Claude Lorrain, Nicolas Poussin, and Salvator Rosa.

Few changes distinguish this edition of Thomas West’s Guide to the Lakes from the second, which was revised and “considerably extended” by both West and William Cockin (Bicknell 34). Cockin assisted West with the original guide, and took over work on the second edition following West’s death in 1779 (Bicknell 34, original biblio, ODNB-Cockin). The third edition features an editor’s preface noting West’s inferiority as an English writer. A second notable change occurs early in the text: where West had previously insisted that everyone has cause to visit the Lakes, he (or perhaps his editor) now deem the tour appropriate for those “in easy circumstances” (4). The guide is divided into sections featuring areas to visit, and in these, some select views are numbered as stations. Like Gray, West recommends the use of a landscape mirror (Bicknell), and like Hutchinson, describes the scenery of the district in the styles of painters Claude Lorrain, Nicolas Poussin, and Salvator Rosa. This portable handbook was extremely popular, and carried by most travelers to the district (original biblio). An engraved frontispiece depicting Grasmere and an anthology of Lake District writings under the heading “Addenda” appear in this edition; the latter includes Thomas Gray’s tour through the Lake District. A map of the lakes is also specific to the third edition.

Bound in with the LDC’s Guide is Remarks Made in a Tour from London to the Lakes of Westmoreland and Cumberland in the Summer of 1791, by A. Walker. This is possibly Adam Walker (1730/31-1821), an itinerant lecturer and writer born in Westmorland and later based in London. Walker also published notes on a continental tour (ODNB). An interesting travelogue in its own right, Remarks is structured as a series of letters that Walker claims to have written on the spot without revision during the tour. He mentions several writers and artists associated with the Lake District, including William Gilpin, Joseph Farington (Farringdon), and James Clarke (Clark).

Format Octavo
Plate Count 1
Map Count 1
Illustrations None
Photographs None
Tables Yes
Binding Colour marbled green
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